How to make a driveway in the garden with irregular stones

There are different types of materials suitable for making irregular paving: you can use broken concrete sheets, if you can find a sufficient number, but the aesthetically and ecologically more valid solution is offered by the so-called ‘’split stones’’, which must be of a thickness of about 3-4 cm.

There are different types of materials suitable for making irregular paving: you can use broken concrete sheets, if you can find a sufficient number, but the aesthetically and ecologically more valid solution is offered by the so-called ‘’split stones’’, which must be of a thickness of about 3-4 cm.

The stratified rocks that break into thin sheets are ideal for composing irregularly shaped paths and are available at fairly low prices.

You then proceed by tracing the edges of the path through ropes or twines, the margins don’t need to be precisely defined. Alternatively, you can let the stones form irregular unions with the lawn or gravel, laying one or two single stones over the edge of the driveway, to better define some areas of the garden.

Along the route, delimited by ropes, the ground is removed by replacing it with a layer of sand, on which the stones are placed directly.

An area of ​​the flooring is created by selecting the stones that are as complementary as possible to each other, avoiding leaving continuous linear joints.

If necessary, the stones can be split with mallet and wide-blade chisel, making sure you use the larger stones to define the perimeter of the driveway. Place the individual stones in the sand bed with a wooden mallet or with a hammer and a wooden block, until they are stable and leveled.

Leveling and finishing step for driveway with irregular stones

Once the surface of about one square meter has been covered, the coplanarity of the stones is checked with the use of a straightedge.

If necessary, sand is added or removed under the individual stones until the surface is perfectly leveled. After completing most of the driveway area, fill the gaps with small stones, tapping them in place with the wooden mallet.

Spread more sand, making it penetrate through the junctions by simply using a broom.

Alternatively, you can prepare a hard, almost dry mortar, and press it into the junctions using the trowel.

To finish it, smooth the mortar joints with an old brush and clean the stones by passing over a damp sponge.